Tag Archives: Spirituality

Are You an Eternal Being?

If truth is permanent, non-changing, unabated, immutable, and perhaps even beyond time, then life as we are taught, ever-changing, temporary, and doomed for death must not be truth. If it does not carry the essences of not truth, it by default must be non-truth, deception, or illusory.

For life to not be illusory, it by default has to be something else other than what most of us have been taught it to be or presently perceive it to be. For how can something that will end be truth, once it longer exists? Surely non-existence cannot be truth.

Another option for solving this puzzle would be to change truth’s definition, after which truth would no longer be, except for perhaps another concept in this seemingly unstable and ever changing world.

Perhaps this is part of the reasoning behind all the world religions that state that we are eternal beings. If we are not eternal, then we do not truly exist, as we have proven that if not eternal or beyond time, it is not truth and must, therefore, be of an illusory nature, or merely the result of fluctuations in an ever-changing world based on causation.

So, when we ask, “what is life?” – perhaps that is why we get a thousand different answers, further proving that life is either a.) An illusion or, b.) We don’t know as much as we say or think we know. There must be something more to it that we do not see.

One could argue that perhaps something else that I have left out or something that we have not yet discovered may yield a more complete and definite answer on life. Still, for that thing to be truth, it too would need to have a nature pointing to permanence, timelessness, or that which is beyond time as well.

Yet, if I were to say you do not exist, or that you are an illusion, based on the same arguments, you would think me to be rather mad, and perhaps rightfully so. Since you do seem to exist and you believe that your existence is truth, despite your slowly changing form and fluctuating states of mind, your true essence, as opposed to your fluctuating mass must, therefore, be eternal or beyond time itself. Otherwise, you are illusory or a simple result of temporary causation at best. So, for the essence or your existence to be truth you must be, like it or not, an eternal being, entity, form, or energy.

If we are not eternal, or beyond time, we are illusory or merely phenomenon based on causation or more simply stated non-truth and illusion. So, if we truly exist, logic dictates that what we are at our truest essence does not actually die or is eternal and or is beyond time, because any apparent truth that can cease to be is not truth.

The Life of Sri Ramakrishna

A fast look at the life of Ramakrishna – February 16, 1836, to August 16, 1886

Early Life

Gadadhar Chatterjee was born in a remote village named Kāmārpukur in West Bengal. It was an area of rice-fields, banyans, palms, a few lakes, and a nearby mango orchard. A road passed through the village to the great temple of Jagannāth at Puri traveled by workers, farmers, holy men, and pilgrims.

As a child, Gadadhar Chatterjee loved listening to stories from Hindu mythology and the epics. Afterward, he could recite them from memory. This brought great joy to the villagers. He also enjoyed painting and molding images of the gods and goddesses. Mathematics was his greatest dislike.

At the age of six or seven Gadādhar had his first experience of spiritual ecstasy while walking between the rice fields. He fell unconscious during the vision and some villagers that found him carried him home.

Gadadhar’s parents were poor Brahmins, the highest rank in the Hindu caste system. He received a simple village education and was a mischievous child, eventually shunning his education. Gadadhar’s father died when he was only seven years old.

Growing up Gadadhar became interested in the wandering monks and pilgrims who stopped at his village on the way to the temple at Puri. At sixteen Gadadhar traveled to Calcutta to assist his eldest brother, Ramkumar, in his duties as a priest. His brother hoped to encourage Gadadhar to complete his education.

The Temple at Dakshineshwar

2013-Kolkata-Dakshineshwar-106
Kali Temple, Dakshineshwar, Kolkata Photo by By Wiki-uk (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Within a few years, Ramkumar served at the new temple in the nearby village of Dakshineshwar, a few miles outside of Calcutta, now called Kolkata. Ramkumar became a priest at the temple of Kali, known as the Divine Mother. The temple is still located along the banks of the east bank of the Ganges River or to be technical the distributary known as the Hooghly River.

The temple grounds were purchased by a rich widow named Rani Rasmani. She created a temple garden and constructed the temple of Radhakanta, the Twelve Siva Temples, and the main temple dedicated to Kali, the Divine Mother. The dedication ceremony took place on May 31, 1855.

When Ramkumar died in 1856, Gadadhar assumed the role of the priest to the Divine Mother Kali. He spent long periods of time in meditation, sometimes neglecting his formal duties while lost in ecstatic singing before the temple image of Kali.

Gadadhar also spent whole nights in meditation in the deep jungle north of the temples. The area was thick with underbrush and at one time used as a burial ground. The locals shunned the area, even during daylight, for fear of ghosts. He would stay all night returning to his room in the morning with his eyes swollen from weeping.

It soon became impossible for him to perform his temple duties. The temple manager relieved him of his duties and gave him use of every facility for his spiritual quest. The temple manager was the son in law of Rani Rasmani, who had developed great respect and admiration for Gadadhar.

It was from that setting, the garden at the temple and his solitary spot in the jungle, that Gadadhar Chatterjee transformed into the loved and revered God-loving master known as Sri Ramakrishna.

In 1859 Gadadhar’s mother arranged a marriage for him, hoping to bring him back to an earthlier existence. It did not work. When the bride became of age to join her husband at the temple he remained celibate, eventually worshiping her as a symbol of the deity Kali. Ramakrishna viewed all women as a manifestation of the Divine Mother. His wife was Ma Sarada.

In 1861 a woman Master of Tantra declared Ramakrishna an avatar. The local religious authorities investigated and accepted her claim. Mahendra Gupta quotes the nameless woman as having said to Ramakrishna “My son, everyone in this world is mad. Some are mad for money, some for creature comforts, some for name and fame; and you are mad for God.” Although Mahendra Gupta does not appear to name the women, from the book “The Sayings of Ramakrishna,” I believe her name was Bhairavi Brahmana as the stories from both books converge in 1861.

Over the next few years, he worshiped Rama and Krishna as the formless Brahman of the Vedanta branch of Hinduism. He went on to also find God through Islam, and later by Jesus Christ. His gospel was the gospel of unity and diversity. Ramakrishna is recognized worldwide for his message that all religions are paths to the truth. He taught that The Ultimate Reality is one, but it is personal as well as impersonal and is indicated by different names in different religions This view is known as Pluralism.

Gradually Ramakrishna attracted more public attention as devotees, and visitors flocked to his room in the temple garden overlooking the Ganges River. He attracted a diverse mixture of people including scholars of Sanskrit, educated intellectuals, shop owners, landowners, educators, and common people. Among those who gathered, was also Ramakrishna’s most beloved disciple, Swami Vivekananda.

About the Book – The Gospel of Ramakrishna

Sri Ramakrishna was a simple villager and produced no writings. The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna was written in Bengali by Mahendra Gupta, who was a high school headmaster from Calcutta. Mahendra Gupta wrote under the name M. Whenever you are reading of Ramakrishna and see M either speaking or being asked a question, know that is referring to Mahendra Gupta.

It is interesting to note that Mahendra Gupta was also a teacher to the well-known Paramahansa Yogananda, who spoke and wrote quite fondly of M.

The Gospel of Ramakrishnan is an eyewitness account of the Master’s conversations with visitors, devotees, and disciples during the years 1882 -1886. The book is hailed as one of the greatest spiritual classics of the twentieth century, as it was translated into English almost six decades later.

The unabridged book starts chapter one with Mahendra Gupta’s first meeting with Ramakrishna in February of 1882.

The Setting

By this time, the 1800s had already brought the Battle of Waterloo, the first photographs, the California Gold Rush, and the invention of the Typewriter.

Within two years, the Taiping rebellion in China would end with 20 million people dead. The American Civil War was only in its third year. Queen Victoria was on the throne and steamboats had been crossing the Atlantic for nearly 45 years. The Transcontinental Railroad in the United States was still five years from completion.

The Austro-Prussian War was four years away. Cash registers and incandescent light bulbs were not yet in use. There were no telephones. There were no radios. The first commercial movie film wouldn’t debut for another 30 years. The first home refrigerators would not appear for  47 years.

Ramakrishna trance 1879
Ramakrishna in samadhi supported by his nephew Hriday and surrounded by Brahmo devotees. Photograph taken on Sunday, September 21, 1879 at the house of Keshab Chandra Sen, Calcutta.
In this world backdrop, M takes us to what seems like an almost magical time and place in the beautiful gardens at the temples along the Ganges River. It was a different and distant world, in a far more peaceful time. It was as a flower that can never be replicated. The nearby jungle has since been cleared and replaced by a modern city. Nowadays Highway 2 runs practically next door to the temple.

It was on a Sunday in the spring of 1880, that M first arrived at the Dakshineshwar Temple. He and his companion Sidhu arrived at dusk while visiting gardens at Baranagore. They found Ramakrishna sitting on a wooden couch facing east. He smiled as he talked about God to a room full of people totally absorbed in his words.

M was speechless and did not want to leave. Sill, he thought, “Let me see this place first.” Leaving the room, they could hear the music from the temple service, the gongs, bells, and cymbals. He could also hear the music at the south end of the garden. A spring wind blew carrying the fragrance of the flowers and the moon had just appeared.

After visiting the temples, they returned to Sri Ramakrishna’s room finding him alone. The master requested they sit. He asked them “Where do you live? What is your occupation? Why did you come to visit Baranagore?” After some conversation, M saluted the Master to leave.

“Come again,” Sri Ramakrishna said.

It was from this meeting that the book known as The Gospel of Ramakrishna started. Much of what we know of him and his teachings, including his biography, is contained in this book.

(It is interesting to note that early in the book M crosses paths with devotee named Narendranath Datta. Narendranath went on to become Swami Vivekananda.)

 

A Fast Glimpse at Ramakrishna’s Message

Lex Hixon wrote, “Ramakrishna in not a quaint person from and ancient culture, representing a particular religious background, but and Einstein of the planetary civilization of the near future, a greenhouse for the future evolution of humanity.”

Some of Ramakrishna’s teachings include that the goal of human life is the realization of the Ultimate Reality, God, which the only thing that can give man true fulfillment and everlasting peace.

He believed that God, or the Ultimate Reality, can be realized through various paths and that all religions are true in so long as they lead to the same ultimate Goal.

He thought that God dwells in all people but the manifestation of God varies from person to person. In saintly people, there is a greater manifestation of God than in others.

He strongly believed that Women are special manifestations of Divine Mother of the Universe, and so are to be treated with respect.

Helping the needy should be done not out of compassion but rather as humble service to God

God realization is possible for all. The householders need not renounce the world, but they should pray sincerely. God listens to sincere prayer. Intense longing is the secret of success in spiritual life.  Trough spiritual practices, man can overcome his evil tendencies, and divine grace can redeem even the worst sinner.

The Gospel of Ramakrishna Translated

The first English translation was published in 1942 by Swami Nikhilananda. Swami Nikhilananda also produced and abridged version, so keep this in mind if you ever research or purchase.

Both books are long and difficult for those not familiar with either Ramakrishna or any aspects of Hinduism. The best thing for a beginner to do is to get a condensed and annotated version.

I researched and found the Skylight Illumination version as a starting point. I found it easy to read and like all Skylight Illumination books, all foreign words and concepts are annotated in an easy to follow manner. The title is Selections from the Gospel of Ramakrishna. It also includes and index.

Free Links for Ramakrishna Material

Biography only – from The Gospel of Ramakrishna  http://www.belurmath.org/gospel/introduction.htm/

Read or search The Gospel of Ramakrishna free online http://www.belurmath.org/gospel/

Full the text version of The Gospel of Ramakrishna https://archive.org/stream/GospelOfSriRamakrishnaTheMahendranathGupta/TheGospelOfSriRamakrishna_djvu.txt

The Gospel of Ramakrishna  PDF http://www.wearesentience.com/uploads/7/2/9/3/7293936/gospel_srk.pdf

Sayings of Ramakrishna PDF http://estudantedavedanta.net/Sayings%20of%20Sri%20Ramakrishna.pdf

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Thoughts on the Separation or Fall

Eden was an epic event. Whether you believe it to be allegorical, psychological, anthropological, developmental, or a doctrine of absolute literal truth, I believe at least some of the following will still apply.

One point we can glean from this story of the fall, or separation as some like to call it, is that when we grasped to be like God [or our Higher Power] by knowing the difference between good and evil, we not only separated ourselves from God, but we also separated from each other and even our own selves.

Before that event, our relationship with Him was so close that the entire concept of being like Him was foolishness. We were already so near Him in our natural state that there was no real conceivable need to be as him, except for perhaps the desire of the Ego. He communicated with us. We understood Him. Only peace and harmony existed. Division among men had not yet been conceived. No issues to divide us had yet come into existence.

Once we fell and we separated from God, we likewise found ourselves with a new separate identity considerably different from the previous one. The consequences of knowing good from evil were more than what was anticipated. We now had a good and bad self. Judgment, shame, good and bad, right and wrong, fear, danger, reward and punishment all came into being.

Man gained the capacity to oppose God, other men, and even himself. The core of our being was fragmented. We could dislike parts of ourselves or dislike ourselves entirely. We compared ourselves to others and found ourselves superior or inferior. Hence we not only split from God but likewise from others and ourselves.

Lucas Cranach d.Ä. - Adam und Eva (National Gallery of Art)
Adam and Eve in Paradise by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472–1553)
From that point forward, we based everything we see, do, and believe on that new flawed or fractured identity. The ego rose to supremacy, alone against all others and even somewhat frightened as our psychologists will tell us. It created a group called us for safety, protection, and support. It created the group called them as in those who are different or not among us, who are enemies, or at least potential enemies.

Nearly everything mankind has created from that point forward was built on that separation, that fractured personality, or the new renegade ego. All society, ancient and modern, reflects this with me, us, and them mentality. Society at large is the macrocosm of the microcosm.

Mankind has been trying to fix himself and his problems ever since and just one look and we can see how well he is doing. The us and them mentalities are so ingrained that if it were possible for one side of the equation to drop that mentality, surely the other side would conquer and destroy them. And that they must do, as it is the nature of the separation, the fractured being, and the extended fractured society.

The other side could not help but to continue the judging of right and wrong, superior and inferior, and reward and punishment. It must do so by its fractured nature. It is one of the bigger consequences of the fall. Man needs to attack others and defend himself. Attacking others is part of his defense. He is an ever comparing, ever criticizing, ever projecting, and ever judging creature. Just list all the judgment and criticism you hear for one single day. Write it down as the day progresses. It comes at you from all directions, work, relatives, friends, the television, the papers, and more. Also, add your own critical and judgmental thoughts to the list. You will be surprised if you can stay focused enough to do the exercise,

Man has a need to prove himself or his group right. Prone to violence, man will strike others to prove himself correct. He justifies his anger then justifies his attack on others verbally or physically. The cycle escalates. Entire societies get involved and the division increases exponentially resulting in fights, elections, murder, protests, and riots. The ultimate effect of separating, of creating us and them, is war.

Although the rate of death from war is declining since 1945, we have no guarantee that trend will continue. The Peace Pledge Union Project claims that three times more people have been killed in wars in the last ninety years than in the previous five hundred. My search on how many days there have been no wars in the past century ranges from 26 days to 45 days. One could argue that having a fifty-year decline during a historical surge is not the best argument for progress. Perhaps that is why it is said, “Blessed are the peacemakers.”

Before the fall there was no need for peacemakers. Since the fall, however, creating peace is a very difficult thing to do. Ironically, it’s a good way to make enemies or even get killed.

[Inspired by ACIM Chapter 5, II, 1-11]

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Facing Problems and Fears

Thoughts on Facing Problems and Fears

What is the best way to face our problems and fears? We are told many ways not to face them. Do not dramatize them, as that makes them bigger. Fighting them also makes them worse. If you push them down, swallow them, or run from them that makes them bigger too.

Everyone knows ways to run from things. We can use drugs, over-working, alcohol, relationships, games, or other entertainment. We can use food, illness, denial, anger, humor, or neurosis. It becomes obvious that running is rarely a good idea.

By facing them properly we are told, the fears and problems dissolve and you see that they never were anything at all. At least, that is what Gangaji and other great teachers tell us. It sounds good but quite frankly the author of this post just isn’t there yet. Are you?

Let’s Explore

Ultimately we lose everything. Everything we fear must eventually vanish, but we also lose all we hold important. Our jobs, our homes, health, our mates, our children, our possessions, our friends, and our pets; we lose them all eventually. Nothing lasts forever and no one gets out of here alive.

We understand these things intellectually. They are obvious. Still, it is not so easy to actually live these ideas at the higher spiritual levels. Instead, all those things become even more problems and things to fear.

We can remember Ramana Maharshi, in “Who Am I?” We grasp the realization that we are not our bodies. We realize that we are not our thoughts and emotions. We are not even the air that we breathe. We discover that we are is that force which animates or allows all those things.

Can’t that just be another intellectual layer? A person can say I’m not this body and the problem is only an illusion, but if the fear or problem remains, the process is only another layer or a cheap mask at best.

The intellectual realizations may calm us in many instances. But how do we know we are really succeeding? How do we know we are facing problems and fear properly? The answer would be when they no longer consume us or cause, fear, worry, anger, or any other negative emotion. The answer is when we stop replaying them within our minds, in a repetitive loop.

Somehow we are to live, love, and experience both good and bad, but yet let go once the experiences are over. We are not to attempt recreating things the great teachers tell us.  But we do try. We experience fun, love, or joy and we try to recreate it. We have a special moment with someone and try to relive it. A couple has a special moment with the first child, they try to replicate it for the second child. Often it is not the same. Sometimes it is a disappointment. Clinging to happiness, we are told, chases it away. Misery appears as the joy vanishes.

We also recreate problems and fears. We humans like revisiting them too much to let go. We do it constantly. We worry. We obsess. We replay our fears and problems over and over in our minds. It’s almost a bit masochistic, isn’t it?

Some people carry their problems, pains, and fears so proudly they tell everyone they meet.  You would think they were medals of honor they received for heroic deeds. They can’t stop trying to relive and recreate the problems, the fears, or the pain. It becomes their identity. Still, embracing them and clinging to them is not truly facing them. “Emotionalism is the avoidance of the deepest emotions,” Gangaji tells us.

We also try to recreate spiritually. Meditation is an example. If we achieve a great feeling or realization, we keep trying to get it back. The chase almost always ends in frustration. We are told that we are not to do that. Krishnamurti instructs not to expect anything when we meditate. If you are expecting, you really aren’t meditating. You are chasing, or running. Trying to relive the past experience is not meditating. Furthermore the more you chase that blissful feeling, the more it eludes you. Only when you let go and let go of the grasping and expecting are you meditating he tells us. Many of the great teachers go on to tell us that life is the same way.

Problems, fears, happiness, life, and meditation seem to have some commonalities. Running from any of them seems futile. Nothing is gained. Clinging to them does not bring happiness or solve things either. It is opposite. Clinging to any them makes you feel worse or backfires.

It seems like you need the same approach for all of them. There seems to be a middle road that is difficult to find.   Do not cling. Do not run. Do not overanalyze. Do not recreate. Do not expect. Do not force. Do not fight. Do not judge. Do not justify. Do not regret, Do not repress. Do not hold grudges. Do not blame. Do not hate.

There seems to be no escape. The only way to approach fear and pain is with a calm level mind. “No matter how much you try to run away from hurt, you still experience it.”  Gangaji



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I Am in My Father, and You in Me, and I in You

In John 14:20 Jesus said, “In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you.” John 14:20

Have you ever tried to visualize this or draw a picture? It seems we often hear or read this one and quickly move on to the next verse. Yet it what it says is much more profound than most people realize. If you take the time to think about it, it may get a bit confusing, but I have found that putting thing such as this into visuals make them simpler, easier to grasp, and even fun.

This fast series of simple visuals helps to put this in perspective and ties it all together in the last slide. Also included are some additional verses for each slide. For brevity, I have limited it to versus two per line.

I am In my Father

Chist in the Father

[“In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you.”]

This is simple enough. Christ is the blue and the father is purple. Below here are two verses for those who like to go deeper.
“Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me, or else believe on account of the works themselves.” John 14:11
“All things have been handed over to me by my Father, and no one knows who the Son is except the Father, or who the Father is except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.” Luke 10:22

and you in Me

Visual of "You in Me" John 14:20

[“In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you”]

“I am the vine; you are the branches. Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing. “John 15:5
“Now you are the body of Christ and individually members of it. 1 Corinthians 12:27

and I in you.

visual "I in you" John 14:20[In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you]

Below are 2 more verses to consider.
To them God chose to make known how great among the Gentiles are the riches of the glory of this mystery, which is Christ in you, the hope of glory. Colossians 1:27

Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you? 1 Corinthians 3:16

In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you

At last, we can tie it all together visually. We humans are the white circle. The Son of God or the Son of Man is the blue. He is both the circle surrounding us and the circle inside us. The Father encompasses all.

visulal"You Will Know That I Am in My Father, and You in Me, and I in You"[In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you]

Here are some other verses to consider as you look at the last slide:

“I and the Father are one.” John 10:30
“that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me.” John 17:21

I hope the slides helped or at least give you something to think about. I have been thinking of putting this together for over a year. I’m glad I finally got around to it.

Paul Nieto

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Gangaji – what do you want?

What do you really want? Do you know? Could you possibly only think you do? Maybe thinking about it seems as a waste of time. There are so many responsibilities.  “It’s just pie in the sky.” Life dictates too many other obligations.

Suppose you are in a group of people instructed to make personal want lists. Many want a better life, a better job, more money, a new car, to be happy all the time, or to find love. Others want status, fame, power, enough money to quit working, or maybe a better sex life.

The first thing you notice is that many of those goals are vague. What is a better life? Let’s say you want more money. Suddenly a strange man approaches.  “Here ya go mate, have a twenty-dollar bill on me.” Then he gives you the money. Let’s say another person wants love. “Here you go, take this puppy. She’ll love you and be your most loyal friend.”

Those outcomes fit the definitions of the goals but may fall short of what was intended. You need to be specific. Isn’t that what the self-help experts tell you? Of course, it is. Next, you clean up your goal list and they send you on your way.

Now that the goals are specific, let’s go deeper. Gangaji suggests you ask “What will that give me?” In Code of the Extraordinary Mind, Vishen Lakhiani of Mindvalley asks the similar question. Next, he instructs you to separate ends goals from means goals.

For example, take the goal – I want money. That is primarily a means goal says Lakhiani. You use the money to get something else. You need to ask yourself some questions. Why do you want it? What for?  A person might give this answer. “I want money to travel, so I can see new places and meet lots of people.” That is an ends goal. But maybe you don’t need money for that. What? Are you crazy?  No, I’m not. Maybe what you need is the right job.

Picture of Gangaji
Picture of Gangaji on 2003 autobiography

Maybe you need to get out of your current rut and find a job that lets you do more of those things. You may not travel the world, but maybe you can travel the country, the state, or even just the city and surrounding areas. That could be a huge start. It sure beats sitting in a cubical or standing on an assembly line. You will certainly meet more people. You may have to cut your cost of living, but if you are happier isn’t it worth it?

I think you get the idea. A college degree is a means goal. The job you want is the ends for that goal.  Means goals are as important as ends goals. There are times and places for both. It is helpful to know the difference. Knowing the desired end prevents you from an endless pattern of means goals that never lead to an end. Knowing the desired end can save you time and make the difference between drudgery and happiness.

This sounds great. You are specific, and can now separate the means from the ends, and sometimes find quicker ways to your goal. Then what? Could there be more?

Let’s say you want to meet people. You want to help people. Maybe you want security. A $90,000 per year job and 1.5-million-dollar brokerage account may represent security. The perfect soul mate will bring you joy and love. That dream job may give you fulfillment. Helping people may give you purpose.

But wait! Could there be any Deception? Could we still be confusing the end goals with means goals at a deeper hidden level. Could your end goal be a means goal in disguise? And once we reach our goals, don’t we always just want something else?

Everyone wants love, happiness, significance, spiritual meaning, or some kind of enlightenment. Many people want security.  We are lead to believe our goals will give us those things. The questions Gangaji asks are “Are those things really dependent on an outside circumstance? Or are they already within you?”

Is a marriage partner required for love? Could that goal simply be another attempt at seeking happiness externally? Could that concept of love be a boxed-in or limited view of love? Beware of the ego here. It will quote you some psychological so-called facts to convince you that what you think, or what society teaches is correct, only to keep you on a never ending quest.

Gangaji says you already have it within you. Love and peace come from within you. If the final answer to your goals is to be at peace or to rest in the truth, then it is possible now and in this moment. Peace, love, and rest have nothing to do with those other external things. And can you really find security in the outside world? And isn’t peace, love, happiness and joy the ultimate end of all goals?

Gangaji instructs us that if we discard our preconceived ideas, or most of what society has programmed into us, we can find many of these things regardless of any internal or external circumstances. In other words, we can short-circuit the whole progression because we already have it within us.

Ramana Maharshi Picture
Ramana Marharshi

Ramana Maharshi at beginning of “Who Am I?” states that all beings desire to be happy and that happiness alone is the case for love.

Let us fast forward to question 24 of that work – What is Happiness?
Answer:
“Happiness is the self. We imagine through our ignorance that we derive happiness from objects. When the mind goes out it experiences misery. In truth when its desires are fulfilled it returns to its own place and enjoys the happiness that is self. (As opposed to the object.)

“The mind moves without rest going out of the self and back into it. A person in the hot sun feels cool when he sits in the shade of a tree. Someone who keeps going from the sun to the shade with no good reason is a fool. A wise person simply stays in the shade.”

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Books worth checking:
The Diamond in Your Pocket – Gangaji
Code of the Extraordinary Mind – Vishen Lakhiani

Free on the web:
A free copy of Who Am I?  Ramana Maharishi
A Quick Look at the Story of Ramana Maharshi

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